Weight had always been a domineering disadvantage throughout my life; starting in my childhood and spanning all the way to my entry into high school. That was what I had always been known for. I was identified in my family as “mập địt” which is basically translated into “fat fuck”. I understood that it was just a lighthearted way of teasing me and at first it didn’t bother me at all. 
Then as I progressed through Elementary school and I accumulated more and more weight I began to grow modestly self conscious about my body. Junior high was a drag through a frozen pond. I wasn’t clinically obese, but I had enough extra baggage to make it noticeable. Friends and classroom acquaintances would repeatedly joke and laugh about my stature. I put on a cheerful façade and coolly played along. To laugh at oneself is to revere oneself, right? False. My lackluster attempts at self mockery only left me with a more dissatisfied outlook of myself. But what could I do? I didn’t possess the self motivation or worth to discontinue my lethargic habits. 
When I crossed the threshold into high school the constant “good humor” seemed to die down. Although I was finally accepted by my peers, I was unhappy with myself. Puberty kicked in and my interest in the opposite gender skyrocketed. Conversationally, I was already awkward around girls and my weight problem only supplemented my feelings of unease. When I finally had my first girlfriend I was ecstatic, but the shallow opinions of her friends melded into her own. I was dumped for my appearance. The break-up was nothing though; it was the reason behind it that put me on edge. Towards the conclusion of that year I fervently resolved to change my lifestyle. I joined sports, I exercised every chance I got, I ate healthier and in smaller portions, I basically did everything I could. It was a grueling few months, but in the end I successfully shed off all of my excess weight. 
My first few steps into my sophomore year were the most defining. People that I had known for years and had known me for my stout physique were appalled by my new exterior. For weeks, I was swarmed with questions concerning my weight loss. (No… I did not do drugs.) Although the attention was a nice change of pace, I didn’t really care for it. I was proud of what I had accomplished. It felt good.

Weight had always been a domineering disadvantage throughout my life; starting in my childhood and spanning all the way to my entry into high school. That was what I had always been known for. I was identified in my family as “mập địt” which is basically translated into “fat fuck”. I understood that it was just a lighthearted way of teasing me and at first it didn’t bother me at all.

Then as I progressed through Elementary school and I accumulated more and more weight I began to grow modestly self conscious about my body. Junior high was a drag through a frozen pond. I wasn’t clinically obese, but I had enough extra baggage to make it noticeable. Friends and classroom acquaintances would repeatedly joke and laugh about my stature. I put on a cheerful façade and coolly played along. To laugh at oneself is to revere oneself, right? False. My lackluster attempts at self mockery only left me with a more dissatisfied outlook of myself. But what could I do? I didn’t possess the self motivation or worth to discontinue my lethargic habits.

When I crossed the threshold into high school the constant “good humor” seemed to die down. Although I was finally accepted by my peers, I was unhappy with myself. Puberty kicked in and my interest in the opposite gender skyrocketed. Conversationally, I was already awkward around girls and my weight problem only supplemented my feelings of unease. When I finally had my first girlfriend I was ecstatic, but the shallow opinions of her friends melded into her own. I was dumped for my appearance. The break-up was nothing though; it was the reason behind it that put me on edge. Towards the conclusion of that year I fervently resolved to change my lifestyle. I joined sports, I exercised every chance I got, I ate healthier and in smaller portions, I basically did everything I could. It was a grueling few months, but in the end I successfully shed off all of my excess weight.

My first few steps into my sophomore year were the most defining. People that I had known for years and had known me for my stout physique were appalled by my new exterior. For weeks, I was swarmed with questions concerning my weight loss. (No… I did not do drugs.) Although the attention was a nice change of pace, I didn’t really care for it. I was proud of what I had accomplished. It felt good.

  1. larrysjelousbuttsex reblogged this from firstaidkiet
  2. tree-whispers reblogged this from firstaidkiet
  3. paopaoguy said: o0o0o0o my bad ~~ swag
  4. firstaidkiet posted this

FIRSTAIDKIET :3

FIRSTAIDKIET :3
Kiet Le. 18. ISU. Vietnamese.
Twerkaholic

Search

previous
next